Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ir.nust.na:8080/jspui/handle/10628/776
Title: Fertility and pregnancy outcome among women undergoing assisted reproductive technology treatment in Windhoek, Namibia.
Other Titles: Thesis presented in fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Health Sciences in the Faculty of Health and Applied Sciences
Authors: Lucas, Adão Francisco
Keywords: Infertility
Human chorionic gonadotropin
Pregnancy outcome
Hormonal imbalance
Assisted reproductive technology
Involuntary childlessness
Ovulation.
Issue Date: Apr-2020
Publisher: Namibia University of Science and Technology
Citation: Lucas, Adão Francisco. (2020). Fertility and pregnancy outcome among women undergoing assisted reproductive technology treatment in Windhoek, Namibia. (Unpublished master's thesis). Namibia University of Science and Technology, Windhoek.
Abstract: Infertility is a worldwide burden that requires attention, and yet has been largely unappreciated and understudied, particularly in sub-Sahara Africa where there is a high prevalence. The stigma of infertility among African women is a serious socio-economic concern that needs to be tackled and alleviated. Infertility has been defined as a couple’s failure to conceive after continuous and unprotected coitus for one year or six months, depending on the age of the female counterpart. Although infertility can be caused by both male and female factors, the female is often to blame and bear the consequences, particularly in cultures that have placed a high premium on children such as those found in Africa. This study therefore, explored the effectiveness of assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment on pregnancy outcomes and assessed possible risk factors that lead to infertility among Namibian women.
URI: http://ir.nust.na:8080/jspui/handle/10628/776
Appears in Collections:Masters and PhD Theses

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