Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ir.nust.na:8080/jspui/handle/10628/688
Title: A narratological analysis of C.M. Elliott’s Sibanda series as representative Zimbabwean crime fiction
Authors: Kangira, Ratidzo
Keywords: Thesis - Namibia
Narratological
C.M. Elliott
Sibanda series
Representative
Zimbabwean
Crime fiction
Genre
Issue Date: Jun-2019
Citation: Kangira, R. (2019). A narratological analysis of C.M. Elliott’s Sibanda series as representative Zimbabwean crime fiction. [Mater's thesis, Namibia University of Science and Technology]. Ounongo Repository.
Abstract: This thesis analysed C.M. Elliott’s Sibanda series as representative Zimbabwean crime fiction. Narratology theory was applied to the analysis of the novels. The study was a qualitative desktop research, and it employed textual analysis in the analysis and interpretation of the selected novels. These are Sibanda and the rainbird (2013), Sibanda and the death’s head moth (2015), and Sibanda and the black sparrowhawk (2017). The study adds to the body of knowledge on African crime fiction as it addresses contemporary societal issues which are relevant. The study further contributes to semiotics and structuralist literary analysis. The study focused on selected narrative strategies in communicating the events in the novels. The researcher analysed Sibanda series by focusing on narrative components such as narrative instance, narrative order, narrative speed and narrative perspective. The narrative aspects which the author employs and their usefulness were also discussed in relation to ritual murder, rhino and elephant poaching (ivory smuggling), and serial murder. The study found that by reading Sibanda and the rainbird (2013), Sibanda and the death’s head moth (2015), and Sibanda and the black sparrowhawk (2017), C.M. Elliott has successfully woven intricate detective narratives using narrative strategies. The narrative strategies enable her to communicate Zimbabwean crime fiction concerns which she has addressed in these three novels in an effective manner. The study recommends for future studies that there might be a need to consider Zimbabwean crime fiction in other genres such as poetry and drama.
Description: THESIS PRESENTED IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF ENGLISH AND APPLIED LINGUISTICS AT THE NAMIBIA UNIVERSITY OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY Supervisor: Professor Sarala Krishnamurthy
URI: http://ir.nust.na/jspui/handle/10628/688
Appears in Collections:Communication



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