Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ir.nust.na:8080/jspui/handle/10628/683
Title: A feminist stylistics study of God of Women and The Woman and the Ogre. [Master's thesis, Namibia University of Science and Technology]. Ounongo Repository.
Authors: Absalom, Wilka Nakashona Twelikondjela
Keywords: Thesis - Namibia
Drama
Feminism
Stylistics
Gender
Representation
Feminist stylistics
Issue Date: Sep-2019
Citation: Absolom, W. N. T. (2019). A feminist stylistics study of God of Women and The Woman and the Ogre.
Abstract: This thesis provides a feminist stylistic analysis of two Namibian plays: God of Women by Francis Sifiso Nyathi (2012) and The Woman and the Ogre by Keamogetsi Joseph Molapong (2002). The key purpose of the study was to find out how Nyathi (2012) and Molapong (2002) used language to represent women characters in their plays. The researcher evaluated the use of language that the playwrights used to depict female characters in the plays. A feminist stylistics framework was employed in this study. The study revealed that both Nyathi (1998) and Molapong (2002) presented women characters as inferior to men characters in their plays. Nyathi (2012) presented women as victims of physical, emotional and sexual abuse at the hands of their husbands in marriage. Molapong (2002) presented women characters negatively as dependent on their fathers. He portrayed women characters as beauty goddesses who are praised based on how beautiful they are, therefore reducing their worth to physical appearance. Furthermore, both playwrights used a wide range of linguistic devices such as metaphors and figures of speech to bring to light the gender roles that are expected of women such as being domestic workers around the home, providing sexual pleasure to their husbands as well as working in the fields to provide food for their families. The study also revealed that the two playwrights used discourse to present women as voiceless, powerless and as each other’s rivals. The study concluded that both Nyathi (2012) and Molapong (2002) largely presented women characters negatively, and the feminist stylistic framework was successful in bringing these presentations to light.
Description: THESIS PRESENTED IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MASTER DEGREE OF MASTER OF ENGLISH AND APPLIED LINGUISTICS AT THE NAMIBIA UNIVERSITY OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY Supervisor: Prof Haileleul Zeleke Woldemariam
URI: http://ir.nust.na/jspui/handle/10628/683
Appears in Collections:Communication



Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.