Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ir.nust.na:8080/jspui/handle/10628/805
Title: Examining trauma and resilience in two Namibian texts: Making a Difference and Mukwahepo
Authors: Uusiku, Saara K. K.
Keywords: Thesis
Namibia
Trauma
Resilience
Liberation struggle
Issue Date: Mar-2021
Publisher: Namibia University of Science and Technology
Citation: Uusiku, S. K. K. (2021). Examining trauma and resilience in two Namibian texts: Making a Difference and Mukwahepo [Master's thesis: Namibia University of Science and Technology].
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to examine trauma and resilience in two Namibian Texts: Making a difference and Mukwahepo. The texts comprise of a biography and an autobiography respectively. The authors are two female Namibian authors who shared their experiences during the Namibian war of liberation. They present their stories from two similar experiences. The trauma and resilience theories were applied as a lens to try and understand how they suffered and what mechanisms they engaged to overcome their struggles. The study used a qualitative method to analyse the two texts. The text selection criteria was used to select these two texts. First, these texts are Namibian female-authored novels that were not previously studied, and therefore do not repeat a previous formal study. There are no previous established works of the Namibian literature that narrate liberation war historical events. These Namibian-authored texts offer a new set of understanding that nourishes that Namibian literary scene. There are very few literature authors and scholars in Namibia that it is merely impossible to conduct a proper literature review. The study results established that trauma could impact individuals in different ways depending on their traumatic experiences. The most traumatising experiences of Mukwahepo was living in poverty in independent Namibia after sacrificing a lifetime contributing to the liberation struggle. On the other hand, although Amathila did not live a life of poverty, liberation war memories still haunted her to an extent that she ended up divorced. This was because she spent long periods of time separated from her husband, Ben Amathila during the liberation struggle and in postindependent Namibia. Both Mukwahepo and Amathila overcame their traumatic experiences by sharing their experiences in autobiographical and biographical writing. Mukwahepo who was barren, resorted to adopting refugee camp children as a way of comforting herself. Similar to Amathila, she devoted her life in health services developmental projects in independent Namibia. The study recommends that female Namibian liberation war veterans need emotional support from government and fellow comrades to heal them from their traumatic experiences of the liberation struggle.
Description: THESIS PRESENTED IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF ENGLISH AND APPLIED LINGUISTICS AT THE NAMIBIA UNIVERSITY OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY (NUST)
URI: http://ir.nust.na:8080/jspui/handle/10628/805
Appears in Collections:Communication

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